Intentions, promises, reliance, and capacity by Emile Yusupoff

The High Court has clarified matters relating to the legal concepts of proprietary estoppel and testamentary capacity in the case of James v James and others [2018] EWHC 43 (Ch). In short, proving that you are entitled to property on the basis of a promise and retrospectively showing that a will is invalid due to lack of capacity are both high hurdles

Pets provide vital care, court rules

We’ve all had noisy neighbours at some point in our life. Whether it’s the teenage son practising his drums or babies crying in the early hours, there are times when we’ve all had enough. But one noise complaint in particular has warmed our hearts at Bridge Law, as we remember that dogs are very much for life and not just for Christmas…

Christmas is Coming……

Before we know it the big day will be upon us. The family courts are busy as ever with parents making arrangements in relation to their children. At this time of year the conversations inevitably get around to who the children will spend Christmas with. It is a special day but fighting over that day will ruin it for the children. It is important for parents to plan in advance and try to reach an agreement. If sharing Christmas Day somehow works all well and good but more often than not it doesn’t. Children don’t want to be torn away from their new toys, their Christmas dinner or family parties. It is often seen as better for parents to alternate Christmas Eve through Christmas Day and Christmas Day evening through Boxing Day. In that way the children can enjoy two special days with each side of the family without being stuck in the middle and the whole spirit of Christmas being lost. For help regarding child arrangements or any other family law issues contact Carole-Anne Baker on 0161 427 0084   Carole-Anne Baker Consultant Family Solicitor

Where there’s a Will, there’s a way…

Where there’s a Will, there’s a way, or so the saying goes. But when 40% of adults don’t have a Will and the number of cases where Wills are contested climbing, the law around Wills and what happens to your estate when you die can be confusing and easier to ignore. The team here at Bridge Law have sat down to answer your questions.

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